Post(s) tagged with "new york"

Conan O’Brien Will Officiate a Gay Wedding on His Show Next Week
To commemorate his one-year anniversary at TBS, Conan O’Brien is taping his late-night show Conan at New York’s Beacon Theater next week, but that milestone won’t be the  only cause for celebration. Vulture hears that O’Brien will be  officiating an on-air wedding during one of those episodes, and it’s the  sort of marriage ceremony that couldn’t have taken place back when  O’Brien used to tape his show in New York: a legal wedding between two  men.
Show sources are quick to caution that the potentially  groundbreaking event is no mere publicity stunt, and isn’t intended to  make light of gay marriage — in fact, O’Brien will be marrying a  longtime staffer and his partner.
If the idea of a late-night wedding sounds familiar, you may be thinking of the union between Tiny Tim and Miss Vicki on The Tonight Show nearly 42 years ago, a televised marriage ceremony that shattered  late-night ratings records. Weddings have since been big business for  morning talk shows and sweeps-week prime-time serials, but they’ve been  surprisingly absent from the late-night landscape until now. Still,  don’t expect a save-the-date card just yet: Producers are still  determining which night the Conan wedding will air.

Conan O’Brien Will Officiate a Gay Wedding on His Show Next Week

To commemorate his one-year anniversary at TBS, Conan O’Brien is taping his late-night show Conan at New York’s Beacon Theater next week, but that milestone won’t be the only cause for celebration. Vulture hears that O’Brien will be officiating an on-air wedding during one of those episodes, and it’s the sort of marriage ceremony that couldn’t have taken place back when O’Brien used to tape his show in New York: a legal wedding between two men.

Show sources are quick to caution that the potentially groundbreaking event is no mere publicity stunt, and isn’t intended to make light of gay marriage — in fact, O’Brien will be marrying a longtime staffer and his partner.

If the idea of a late-night wedding sounds familiar, you may be thinking of the union between Tiny Tim and Miss Vicki on The Tonight Show nearly 42 years ago, a televised marriage ceremony that shattered late-night ratings records. Weddings have since been big business for morning talk shows and sweeps-week prime-time serials, but they’ve been surprisingly absent from the late-night landscape until now. Still, don’t expect a save-the-date card just yet: Producers are still determining which night the Conan wedding will air.

(via A Gay Wedding Windfall for New York - Businessweek)

(via A Gay Wedding Windfall for New York - Businessweek)

Source: businessweek.com

gayinnj:

Jamey Rodemyer, 14, Committed Suicide in Response to Incessant Tormentors

Jamey had been bullied for years in school and online for not only his sexual orientation but also his weight and hateful speech of all kinds was sent his way. In May he came out to his friends as bisexual, and even made his own “It Gets Better” video to spread the message of hope he desperately wanted to believe in himself. But it seems that the hateful words only increased to an unbearable point, and feeling he had no one to turn to, on Sunday September 18th, only days before the anniversary of Tyler Clementi’s death last year, Jamey killed himself outside his home in Williamsville, NY.
You might have heard the news that Jamey was a huge Lady Gaga fan, even claiming that she was “the reason why I am alive.” The news of his death has left Gaga and people across the world both saddened and angry. Gaga is now pushing for President Obama to “make bullying illegal”, and the Paws Up Forever Project is circulating on YouTube to honor Jamey by discussing the harsh reality of suicide and the horrible bullying that has lead to so many lately.

So what can you do? Keep reaching out to the quiet kid in your class or dorm. Keep telling the ones you love that you are there for them and that they are amazing and beautiful. It might seem simple or even silly, but you never know how your words can heal over the ones that hurt.

gayinnj:

Jamey Rodemyer, 14, Committed Suicide in Response to Incessant Tormentors

Jamey had been bullied for years in school and online for not only his sexual orientation but also his weight and hateful speech of all kinds was sent his way. In May he came out to his friends as bisexual, and even made his own “It Gets Better” video to spread the message of hope he desperately wanted to believe in himself. But it seems that the hateful words only increased to an unbearable point, and feeling he had no one to turn to, on Sunday September 18th, only days before the anniversary of Tyler Clementi’s death last year, Jamey killed himself outside his home in Williamsville, NY.

You might have heard the news that Jamey was a huge Lady Gaga fan, even claiming that she was “the reason why I am alive.” The news of his death has left Gaga and people across the world both saddened and angry. Gaga is now pushing for President Obama to “make bullying illegal”, and the Paws Up Forever Project is circulating on YouTube to honor Jamey by discussing the harsh reality of suicide and the horrible bullying that has lead to so many lately.

So what can you do? Keep reaching out to the quiet kid in your class or dorm. Keep telling the ones you love that you are there for them and that they are amazing and beautiful. It might seem simple or even silly, but you never know how your words can heal over the ones that hurt.

Possible Criminal Charges In Connection With Jamey Rodemeyer Suicide

Police in Buffalo, New York are considering whether to bring criminal charges against students who harassed Jamey Rodemeyer, the 14-year-old junior high school student who committed suicide after being bullied for coming out gay.
In May, Rodemeyer posted a heartbreaking YouTube video for the It Gets Project, which reaches out to struggling gay teens considering suicide.  “Lady Gaga, she makes me so happy, and she lets me know that I was born this way.  And that’s my advice to you from her.  People are born this way.  All you have to do is hold your head up and you’ll go far,” he said in the clip.  “Just love yourself and you’re set … It gets better.”
The video was a relief for his parents who saw it as a sign that their son’s struggle might be coming to an end.
But on Sunday, Rodemeyer, who had just started his freshman year at Williamsville North High School outside Buffalo, was found dead outside his home.  (Police have not released details of how he killed himself.)
Police Chief John C. Askey told the Buffalo News that the department was looking into the case.
“We’ve heard that there were some specific students, an unidentifiable group of students, that had specifically targeted Jamey, or had been picking on him for a period of time,” he said.
Officials said the actions of three students in particular are being investigated.  The students could be charged with aggravated harassment.  (An ABC News report is embedded in the right panel of this page.)

Possible Criminal Charges In Connection With Jamey Rodemeyer Suicide

Police in Buffalo, New York are considering whether to bring criminal charges against students who harassed Jamey Rodemeyer, the 14-year-old junior high school student who committed suicide after being bullied for coming out gay.

In May, Rodemeyer posted a heartbreaking YouTube video for the It Gets Project, which reaches out to struggling gay teens considering suicide. “Lady Gaga, she makes me so happy, and she lets me know that I was born this way. And that’s my advice to you from her. People are born this way. All you have to do is hold your head up and you’ll go far,” he said in the clip. “Just love yourself and you’re set … It gets better.”

The video was a relief for his parents who saw it as a sign that their son’s struggle might be coming to an end.

But on Sunday, Rodemeyer, who had just started his freshman year at Williamsville North High School outside Buffalo, was found dead outside his home. (Police have not released details of how he killed himself.)

Police Chief John C. Askey told the Buffalo News that the department was looking into the case.

“We’ve heard that there were some specific students, an unidentifiable group of students, that had specifically targeted Jamey, or had been picking on him for a period of time,” he said.

Officials said the actions of three students in particular are being investigated. The students could be charged with aggravated harassment. (An ABC News report is embedded in the right panel of this page.)

Source: ontopmag.com

Just Married: Cheyenne Jackson Weds Longtime Partner in New York 
Cheyenne Jackson married his longtime partner, Monte Lapka, today in New  York, taking advantage of the state’s new marriage equality law. "It’s official, after 11 years together, Zora’s no longer a bastard," Jackson wrote on Twitter, joking about the couple’s dog, who was there at the beach in the Hamptons for the event. "Just married the best man I’ve ever known," Jackson wrote.The Broadway star and member of the 30 Rock cast has been thinking about this moment for a long time. He mentioned  it back in 2010 after California’s Proposition 8 ban was ruled  unconstitutional in an early court ruling in that ongoing storyline. "California dreaming, indeed," he wrote at the time. “Makes me feel prouder than ever to be a strong gay man.  Now come on, home state of New York … We all know that you’re the  ‘concrete jungle where dreams r made of,’ so make mine come true and  take the necessary steps to allow me to make it legal with my man. Step  up, we believe in you.”New Yorkers began marrying in June when the state’s new law took effect. Jackson will continue his activism for marriage equality by taking part in an upcoming reading of 8, Dustin Lance Black’s play about the Prop. 8 trial. The one-night-only event happens on September 19.

Just Married: Cheyenne Jackson Weds Longtime Partner in New York

Cheyenne Jackson married his longtime partner, Monte Lapka, today in New York, taking advantage of the state’s new marriage equality law.

"It’s official, after 11 years together, Zora’s no longer a bastard," Jackson wrote on Twitter, joking about the couple’s dog, who was there at the beach in the Hamptons for the event.

"Just married the best man I’ve ever known," Jackson wrote.

The Broadway star and member of the 30 Rock cast has been thinking about this moment for a long time. He mentioned it back in 2010 after California’s Proposition 8 ban was ruled unconstitutional in an early court ruling in that ongoing storyline.

"California dreaming, indeed," he wrote at the time. “Makes me feel prouder than ever to be a strong gay man. Now come on, home state of New York … We all know that you’re the ‘concrete jungle where dreams r made of,’ so make mine come true and take the necessary steps to allow me to make it legal with my man. Step up, we believe in you.”

New Yorkers began marrying in June when the state’s new law took effect.

Jackson will continue his activism for marriage equality by taking part in an upcoming reading of 8, Dustin Lance Black’s play about the Prop. 8 trial. The one-night-only event happens on September 19.

Source: advocate.com

thedailywhat:

Happy Couple of the Day: At Midnight tonight, Kitty Lambert (left) and Cheryle Rudd became the first same-sex couple to legally marry in the state of New York.
“By the power vested in me by the laws of the state of New York I now pronounce you legally married,” said Niagara Falls Paul A Dyster, who presided over the couple’s civil ceremony, shortly after the clock’s struck midnight.
Today also happened to be the 12th anniversary of Lambert and Rudd’s first date.
“This is one of the most incredible moments of my personal life,” Lambert said before the ceremony, “but it’s also an incredible moment for New York.”
[cityroom / photos: ap via tnt.]

thedailywhat:

Happy Couple of the Day: At Midnight tonight, Kitty Lambert (left) and Cheryle Rudd became the first same-sex couple to legally marry in the state of New York.

“By the power vested in me by the laws of the state of New York I now pronounce you legally married,” said Niagara Falls Paul A Dyster, who presided over the couple’s civil ceremony, shortly after the clock’s struck midnight.

Today also happened to be the 12th anniversary of Lambert and Rudd’s first date.

“This is one of the most incredible moments of my personal life,” Lambert said before the ceremony, “but it’s also an incredible moment for New York.”

[cityroom / photos: ap via tnt.]

Niagra Falls alight in rainbow colors for New York Marriage Equality.

Niagra Falls alight in rainbow colors for New York Marriage Equality.

Gay Marriage | Waiting to Make History
Jeanette Coleman, left, and Kawane Harris, who live in Manhattan wait to be married outside the Manhattan City Clerk’s office on Sunday at 7:15am.

Gay Marriage | Waiting to Make History

Jeanette Coleman, left, and Kawane Harris, who live in Manhattan wait to be married outside the Manhattan City Clerk’s office on Sunday at 7:15am.

The New York Times

New York City to Allow More Weddings on Day 1 of Gay Marriage ⇢

So happy all the couples that applied will be married (including your blog hostess), but I do feel terrible for those that did not realize they needed to register of the lottery and will have to wait.

Can’t wait till Sunday!

New York City officials said Thursday that they expected to accommodate every couple who entered a lottery for the chance to wed on Sunday, the first day that same-sex marriage will be permitted in the state.

The city had established a lottery as a precaution, worried that high demand would overload clerk’s offices in the five boroughs on the historic day. But in the end, demand nearly matched supply, with 823 couples applying for 764 slots.

To accommodate the overflow, the city will allow an additional 59 couples to marry. But because of strained resources, 74 couples who had hoped to marry in Manhattan, home to the city’s busiest marriage bureau, will be asked to go to another borough. Those couples will be selected at random, and the city planned to notify them Thursday night.

“Everybody wins,” the City Council speaker, Christine C. Quinn, said in a statement.

The highest demand for marriage licenses was in Manhattan, where 533 couples applied for 400 slots. In the Bronx, 52 couples applied for 98 slots; in Brooklyn, 109 couples applied for 112 slots; in Queens, 91 couples applied for 112 slots; and on Staten Island, 38 couples applied for 42 slots. The actual number of couples hoping to marry on Sunday might be slightly higher. Some couples might show up without having entered the lottery, though city officials have said they will probably not be accommodated.

Hair’ Celebrates Marriage Equality With Onstage Nuptials
The Broadway community has been celebrating the legalization of gay  marriage in the state of New York ever since the news broke a couple of  weeks ago. And to really put the frosting on the cake, the St. James  Theater, currently home to the limited summer revival of Hair,  will usher in several of the first gay marriages taking place in New  York City on July 24th, the day gay marriage officially becomes legal.
The announcement was made outside the theater yesterday by The Book of Mormon’s Rory  O’Malley, who is the co-founder of Broadway Impact, a gay-rights  organization created by members of the Broadway community. Gavin Creel, a  former star of Hair, is also a co-founder of the group. So it seems only fitting that the stage where Hair is being performed nightly, spreading its message of peace and love,  will serve as the stage for some of the first steps towards national  marriage equality.
The couples being married will all be members  of the Broadway community. The ceremonies will take place after that  evening’s performance of the show in front of the entire audience.
On July 24th, New York will become the sixth and largest state to legal gay marriage, which is definitely cause for celebration!

Hair’ Celebrates Marriage Equality With Onstage Nuptials

The Broadway community has been celebrating the legalization of gay marriage in the state of New York ever since the news broke a couple of weeks ago. And to really put the frosting on the cake, the St. James Theater, currently home to the limited summer revival of Hair, will usher in several of the first gay marriages taking place in New York City on July 24th, the day gay marriage officially becomes legal.

The announcement was made outside the theater yesterday by The Book of Mormon’s Rory O’Malley, who is the co-founder of Broadway Impact, a gay-rights organization created by members of the Broadway community. Gavin Creel, a former star of Hair, is also a co-founder of the group. So it seems only fitting that the stage where Hair is being performed nightly, spreading its message of peace and love, will serve as the stage for some of the first steps towards national marriage equality.

The couples being married will all be members of the Broadway community. The ceremonies will take place after that evening’s performance of the show in front of the entire audience.

On July 24th, New York will become the sixth and largest state to legal gay marriage, which is definitely cause for celebration!

Source: ology.com

Judges Signing Up for Sunday Duty at Gay Weddings - NYTimes.com ⇢

On a summer Sunday, Justice Thomas D. Raffaele of State Supreme Court in Queens would usually be in a bathing suit at the Jersey Shore. Instead, on July 24, the Sunday that New York’s same-sex marriage law goes into effect, he plans to be in his judicial robes at the city clerk’s office on Queens Boulevard, ready to marry people, possibly in large numbers.

“I’ve heard there are a lot of people who are very excited,” he said.

As one of several dozen judges across the state who have volunteered to play an official role in the new law’s first day, Justice Raffaele is part of one of the most unusual judicial mobilizations in years. From Buffalo to the Bronx and pretty much everywhere else in New York, judges are signing up for rare Sunday duty.

If same-sex couples want to marry that Sunday, only judges would have the authority to dispense with the 24-hour waiting period required by law. And those judges could then officiate on the spot.

Another of the volunteer judges, Sherry Klein Heitler of State Supreme Court in Manhattan, said she was expecting something of a party at the city clerk’s office. “I think there will be a lot of people,” Justice Heitler said. “I think there will be a lot of emotion. I think there will be a lot of happy tears.”

Bloomberg to Preside at Gay Aides’ Wedding - NYTimes.com
By MICHAEL BARBARO
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg summoned his chief policy adviser, John Feinblatt, to his desk at City  Hall a few days ago for what seemed like a routine conversation with the  boss. “Let’s get a cup of coffee,” the mayor told him, motioning to the  office kitchen.
There, Mr. Bloomberg made an unusual offer. He did not know if Mr.  Feinblatt and his longtime partner, Jonathan Mintz, the city’s  commissioner for consumer affairs, wanted to marry. But if they did, and  were looking for somebody to officiate, he knew just the man for the  job. “If you’d like me to do it, I’d really love to,” Mr. Bloomberg  said.
Mr. Feinblatt, thrilled by the offer but wary of unilateral  decision-making in matters of the heart, said he needed to consult with  Mr. Mintz, who quickly gave his approval.
City Hall’s first gay wedding was on.
“The mayor and John,” Mr. Mintz recalled, “popped the question.”
Mr. Bloomberg, who delivered speeches, held fund-raisers and lobbied lawmakers to legalize same-sex marriage in New York, is now punctuating his official advocacy with a personal  gesture: hosting and presiding at a gay wedding on the first possible  day, in one of the grandest possible settings.
On July 24, on the lawn of Gracie Mansion, under a tent packed with city  officials and food from around New York State, Mr. Bloomberg will  pronounce Mr. Mintz and Mr. Feinblatt husband and husband.
The mayor is a reluctant nuptials officiant who has presided over just  two previous weddings — those of his daughter Emma and his predecessor,  Rudolph W. Giuliani — and has pointedly forsworn performing weddings for  anyone beyond his other daughter or another former mayor.
But he is now making an exception, he said, because of his close  personal connection to Mr. Feinblatt and Mr. Mintz and the role they  played in personalizing the issue of same-sex marriage for him.
“John and Jonathan are two of the smartest and hardest-working people in  our administration,” Mr. Bloomberg said on Thursday. “This just felt  like the best way for me to say thank you.”
Mr. Mintz, 47, and Mr. Feinblatt, 60, met 14 years ago on a blind date  that began, perhaps inauspiciously, with a tour of a Midtown court for  quality of life crimes that Mr. Feinblatt founded, and ended, rather  romantically, with a walk through Central Park and a drink at the  Royalton Hotel.
“It was a classic first date,” Mr. Mintz said.
Not long after, Mr. Mintz relocated from Rhode Island to New York City,  the couple bought a house in the West Village, and, with the help of a  surrogate, fathered two children: Maeve, now 8, and Georgia, 6.
They both took jobs in the Bloomberg administration. Mr. Feinblatt  became the city’s criminal justice coordinator, leading a nationwide  campaign to rid city streets of illegal guns. Mr. Mintz took the helm of  the city’s consumer arm, battling fraud and counseling the poorest New  Yorkers on how to achieve financial independence.
The couple had long talked about marrying, but stumbled over where to do  it. Mr. Feinblatt’s stepmother had a house in Massachusetts, where  same-sex marriage became legal in 2004. But New York was home.
“Our relationship is about New York, choosing to raise our kids here is  about New York, our jobs are about New York,” Mr. Feinblatt said.
So they waited. And waited. And, then, two weeks ago, the waiting was over.
On Sunday, Mr. Mintz gathered his daughters at the family’s weekend home  on Long Island and asked them a question. Wasn’t it time that he  married their father?
The girls jumped up and down and screamed “Yes!” Mr. Mintz then grabbed a  fistful of flowers from the yard and called Mr. Feinblatt outside. With  the girls standing a few feet away, Mr. Mintz bent down on one knee and  made it official.
“He said yes,” Mr. Mintz recalled. “It would have been pretty awkward if he hadn’t after 14 years.”
Later that day, the two men took their daughters ring shopping.
In the days since, Mr. Feinblatt has shuttled Maeve and Georgia across  the state to find the perfect dresses for the occasion. Wedding  invitations are being drawn up. And a meeting with the caterer is  scheduled for next week.
With 17 days to plan, much remains unresolved. Like a honeymoon.
“I suspect we will be at work on Monday after taking the kids to camp,” Mr. Feinblatt said.
“Really?” Mr. Mintz replied. “We will have to discuss that. I am hoping that changes.”
He paused. “Not that I don’t love my job.”

Bloomberg to Preside at Gay Aides’ Wedding - NYTimes.com

Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg summoned his chief policy adviser, John Feinblatt, to his desk at City Hall a few days ago for what seemed like a routine conversation with the boss. “Let’s get a cup of coffee,” the mayor told him, motioning to the office kitchen.

There, Mr. Bloomberg made an unusual offer. He did not know if Mr. Feinblatt and his longtime partner, Jonathan Mintz, the city’s commissioner for consumer affairs, wanted to marry. But if they did, and were looking for somebody to officiate, he knew just the man for the job. “If you’d like me to do it, I’d really love to,” Mr. Bloomberg said.

Mr. Feinblatt, thrilled by the offer but wary of unilateral decision-making in matters of the heart, said he needed to consult with Mr. Mintz, who quickly gave his approval.

City Hall’s first gay wedding was on.

“The mayor and John,” Mr. Mintz recalled, “popped the question.”

Mr. Bloomberg, who delivered speeches, held fund-raisers and lobbied lawmakers to legalize same-sex marriage in New York, is now punctuating his official advocacy with a personal gesture: hosting and presiding at a gay wedding on the first possible day, in one of the grandest possible settings.

On July 24, on the lawn of Gracie Mansion, under a tent packed with city officials and food from around New York State, Mr. Bloomberg will pronounce Mr. Mintz and Mr. Feinblatt husband and husband.

The mayor is a reluctant nuptials officiant who has presided over just two previous weddings — those of his daughter Emma and his predecessor, Rudolph W. Giuliani — and has pointedly forsworn performing weddings for anyone beyond his other daughter or another former mayor.

But he is now making an exception, he said, because of his close personal connection to Mr. Feinblatt and Mr. Mintz and the role they played in personalizing the issue of same-sex marriage for him.

“John and Jonathan are two of the smartest and hardest-working people in our administration,” Mr. Bloomberg said on Thursday. “This just felt like the best way for me to say thank you.”

Mr. Mintz, 47, and Mr. Feinblatt, 60, met 14 years ago on a blind date that began, perhaps inauspiciously, with a tour of a Midtown court for quality of life crimes that Mr. Feinblatt founded, and ended, rather romantically, with a walk through Central Park and a drink at the Royalton Hotel.

“It was a classic first date,” Mr. Mintz said.

Not long after, Mr. Mintz relocated from Rhode Island to New York City, the couple bought a house in the West Village, and, with the help of a surrogate, fathered two children: Maeve, now 8, and Georgia, 6.

They both took jobs in the Bloomberg administration. Mr. Feinblatt became the city’s criminal justice coordinator, leading a nationwide campaign to rid city streets of illegal guns. Mr. Mintz took the helm of the city’s consumer arm, battling fraud and counseling the poorest New Yorkers on how to achieve financial independence.

The couple had long talked about marrying, but stumbled over where to do it. Mr. Feinblatt’s stepmother had a house in Massachusetts, where same-sex marriage became legal in 2004. But New York was home.

“Our relationship is about New York, choosing to raise our kids here is about New York, our jobs are about New York,” Mr. Feinblatt said.

So they waited. And waited. And, then, two weeks ago, the waiting was over.

On Sunday, Mr. Mintz gathered his daughters at the family’s weekend home on Long Island and asked them a question. Wasn’t it time that he married their father?

The girls jumped up and down and screamed “Yes!” Mr. Mintz then grabbed a fistful of flowers from the yard and called Mr. Feinblatt outside. With the girls standing a few feet away, Mr. Mintz bent down on one knee and made it official.

“He said yes,” Mr. Mintz recalled. “It would have been pretty awkward if he hadn’t after 14 years.”

Later that day, the two men took their daughters ring shopping.

In the days since, Mr. Feinblatt has shuttled Maeve and Georgia across the state to find the perfect dresses for the occasion. Wedding invitations are being drawn up. And a meeting with the caterer is scheduled for next week.

With 17 days to plan, much remains unresolved. Like a honeymoon.

“I suspect we will be at work on Monday after taking the kids to camp,” Mr. Feinblatt said.

“Really?” Mr. Mintz replied. “We will have to discuss that. I am hoping that changes.”

He paused. “Not that I don’t love my job.”

Yesterday was the 42nd Anniversary of Stonewall.  Let us not forget where it all began!
The riots following the June 28, 1969 police raid on New York City’s  Stonewall Inn did not start the discussion on gay rights, but it  certainly became the catalyst for a national movement. When the  mafia-owned bar that offered a safe place for gay men and lesbians to  drink and dance was shut down as part of a citywide crackdown on  homosexual life, Greenwich Village erupted into several days of riots.  Violent police beat downs and open mocking of the authorities by the  protesters escalated the neighborhood protest into a full-scale rally  for acceptance and equality. Prior to the Stonewall riots the gay rights  movement had been mostly underground; only two years later there were  organized groups within every major city in America.
Stonewall’s legacy lives on today. After the New York State Senate  voted in favor of same sex marriage on Friday night, revelers from  around the city congregated in front of the bar to celebrate.
(via Stonewall Inn, 1969 - Top 10 Most Influential Protests - TIME)

Yesterday was the 42nd Anniversary of Stonewall.  Let us not forget where it all began!

The riots following the June 28, 1969 police raid on New York City’s Stonewall Inn did not start the discussion on gay rights, but it certainly became the catalyst for a national movement. When the mafia-owned bar that offered a safe place for gay men and lesbians to drink and dance was shut down as part of a citywide crackdown on homosexual life, Greenwich Village erupted into several days of riots. Violent police beat downs and open mocking of the authorities by the protesters escalated the neighborhood protest into a full-scale rally for acceptance and equality. Prior to the Stonewall riots the gay rights movement had been mostly underground; only two years later there were organized groups within every major city in America.

Stonewall’s legacy lives on today. After the New York State Senate voted in favor of same sex marriage on Friday night, revelers from around the city congregated in front of the bar to celebrate.

(via Stonewall Inn, 1969 - Top 10 Most Influential Protests - TIME)

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