Post(s) tagged with "lgbtq"

Washington State Set to Legalize Same-Sex Marriage

YAY WASHINGTON

SEATTLE — Washington on Wednesday became the seventh state to legalize same-sex marriage, with the State House giving final passage to the bill and Gov. Christine Gregoire having promised to sign it.

The measure easily passed the State Senate last week, 28 to 21, despite concerns that the vote would be close.

The developments in Washington parallel an appeals court decision in California on Tuesday in which a panel of judges ruled 2 to 1 to strike down that state’s ban on same-sex marriage, known as Proposition 8. The two deciding judges wrote that the ban violated the Constitution’s Equal Protection Clause.

Washington is among more than 30 states that have passed laws defining marriage as between a man and a woman, but it has steadily expanded rights for gay couples since 2007. That year, the Democratically controlled Legislature approved domestic partnerships. In 2009, it passed an “everything but marriage” bill. Full marriage rights began speeding toward approval last month, when Ms. Gregoire, a Democrat, announced that she would support the bill to make same-sex marriage legal.

The governor had previously said that she did not believe the state was ready for same-sex marriage and that churches should play a decisive role on the issue. Ms. Gregoire’s marriage bill, modeled after one approved by New York last June, allows churches and religious groups to choose not to perform same-sex marriages and to deny same-sex couples access to their facilities for marriage services.

Source: http

Ellen DeGeneres Rips ‘One Million Moms’ For Calling for Her Firing

(via Towleroad)

On a show taped today for broadcast tomorrow, Ellen DeGeneres praised the 9th Circuit’s ruling on Proposition 8, and then launched into a tirade at the AFA organization ‘One Million Moms’ for calling for her firing, E! reports.

Watch the clip, AFTER THE JUMP

As you may recall, the hate group called for JC Penney to fire her as spokesperson because she is, in their words, an “open homosexual”.

Wrote the group:

Funny that JC Penney thinks hiring an open homosexual spokesperson will help their business when most of their customers are traditional families. More sales will be lost than gained unless they replace their spokesperson quickly. Unless JC Penney decides to be neutral in the culture war then their brand transformation will be unsuccessful.

Says Ellen: “Normally, I try not to pay attention to my haters—but this time I’d like to talk about it, because my haters are my motivators. This organization doesn’t think I should be the spokesperson because I’m gay,” DeGeneres continued. “They wanted to get me fired, and I’m proud and happy to say that JCPenney stuck by their decision to make me their spokesperson. Which is great news for me because I also need some new crew socks. I’m really going to clean up with this discount.”

Ellen then read some of the comments from her supporters on the Million Moms Facebook page.

Added Ellen: “I usually don’t talk about stuff like this on my show, but I really want to thank everyone who is supporting me. Here are the values I stand for. I stand for honesty, equality, kindness, compassion, treating people the way you’d want to be treated and helping those in need.To me, those are traditional values. That’s what I stand for…I also believe in dance.”

Source: towleroad.com

Canadian Gov't Dissolves Thousands of Same-Sex Marriages ⇢

Thousands of LGBT couples across the world awoke this morning to learn that they are no longer married.

A Department of Justice lawyer under Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s Conservative Party of Canada government has nullified all same-sex marriages performed in Canada in which the couples’ native country does not permit gays and lesbians to marry.

The reversal of federal policy is revealed in a document filed in a Toronto test case launched recently by a lesbian couple seeking a divorce. Wed in Toronto in 2005, the couple have been told they cannot divorce because they were never really married – a Department of Justice lawyer says their marriage is not legal in Canada since they could not have lawfully wed in Florida or England, where the two partners reside.

The two women – professionals in the their early 30s – cannot be identified under a court order. But Martha McCarthy, a prominent Toronto lawyer who represents them, said the government’s about-face is astonishing.

“It is scandalous,” she said in an interview. “It is offensive to their dignity and human rights to suggest they weren’t married or that they have something that is a nullity.”

Ms. McCarthy, who played an instrumental role in the fight to legalize same-sex marriage, said Ontario has tried to duck the volatile test case by deferring to the federal government.

“It is appalling and outrageous that two levels of government would be taking this position without ever having raised it before, telling anybody it was an issue or doing anything pro-active about it,” she said. “All the while, they were handing out licences to perform marriages across the country to non-resident people.”

Newspapers across the world are covered in headlines about this savage and unprecedented attack on LGBT people.

Dan Savage, who wed his husband (now boyfriend) in Vancouver in 2005, weighs in:

There will be lawsuits, time and money will be wasted, oceans of ink and pixels will be spilled, before this issue—the full civil equality of gays and lesbians—winds up before the Supreme Court of Canada. I’m confident that justice will prevail—God bless the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms—but the decision to reopen this issue is going to be one massive distraction for the Canadian government.

Gays and lesbians inside and outside of Canada are going to make sure of it.

Now if you’ll excuse me I need to go wake up my husband and tell him we got divorced last night.

Critics of this attack on LGBT people have noted both online and off that if gay marriages are now without legal standing in Canada if the couple’s homeland forbids them, are Middle Eastern women living in Canada now stripped of their rights to vote, drive a car, or even show their hair? Is being gay now punishable by death in Canada if you’re from Uganda? Is blogging or criticizing your government now illegal for Egyptians living in Canada?

We can hardly believe we are reporting this. Expect massive coverage in the coming days.

How would you feel to wake up divorced by a foreign government after years of marriage?

*so very very wrong*

(Mr. Lawrence on left in above photo)
John Geddes Lawrence, of Lawrence v. Texas, Has Died at 68
John Geddes Lawrence, the lead named plaintiff in the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case that declared sodomy laws unconstitutional across the country, died on Nov. 20, according to an obituary posted by R.S. Farmer Funeral Home in Silsbee, Texas. He was 68.
According to the obituary, Lawrence was born in Beaumont, Texas, on August 2, 1943, served in the U.S. Navy for four years and worked as a medical technologist in Texas hospitals until his retirement in 2009.
In the facts underlying the Supreme Court case,Lawrence v. Texas, Lawrence and Tyron Garner were arrested under Texas’s Homosexual Conduct Law after police entered Lawrence’s home on Sept. 17, 1998, and saw them “engaging in a sexual act.” The couple challenged the law as unconstitutional, Lambda Legal backed their challenge, and the couple fought it up to the U.S. Supreme Court. Jenner & Block partner Paul Smith then argued the case for Lawrence and Garner on March 26, 2003.
Three months later on June 26, 2003, Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote the court’s opinion, holding, “At the heart of liberty is the right to define one’s own concept of existence, of meaning, of the universe, and of the mystery of human life. … Persons in a homosexual relationship may seek autonomy for these purposes, just as heterosexual persons do.”
At the time, Lambda Legal executive director Kevin Cathcart told The Advocate, “Because Tyron Garner and John Lawrence had the courage to challenge homophobic sodomy laws, the U.S. Supreme Court recognized that love, sexuality, and family play the same role in gay people’s lives as they do for everyone else. That’s a colossal legacy and one for which his community will forever be thankful.”
According to Lawrence’s obituary, “his dearest friend and partner, Jose Garcia,” cared for him at the end of his life. Funeral services were held on Nov. 23.
According to the obituary, in addition to Garcia, Lawrence was survived by his brother, sister and her husband, two nieces and two nephews, as well as a host of grand nieces and nephews, aunts, uncles, cousins and friends. Garner had died earlier, on Sept. 11, 2006.
In concluding the court case, Kennedy wrote an expansive defense of an evolving understanding of rights, later used in Massachusetts and elsewhere by courts holding that same-sex couples have a constitutional basis for equal marriage rights.
"Had those who drew and ratified the Due Process Clauses of the Fifth Amendment or the Fourteenth Amendment known the components of liberty in its manifold possibilities, they might have been more specific. They did not presume to have this insight," Kennedy held. "They knew times can blind us to certain truths and later generations can see that laws once thought necessary and proper in fact serve only to oppress. As the Constitution endures, persons in every generation can invoke its principles in their own search for greater freedom."

(Mr. Lawrence on left in above photo)

John Geddes Lawrence, of Lawrence v. Texas, Has Died at 68

John Geddes Lawrence, the lead named plaintiff in the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case that declared sodomy laws unconstitutional across the country, died on Nov. 20, according to an obituary posted by R.S. Farmer Funeral Home in Silsbee, Texas. He was 68.

According to the obituary, Lawrence was born in Beaumont, Texas, on August 2, 1943, served in the U.S. Navy for four years and worked as a medical technologist in Texas hospitals until his retirement in 2009.

In the facts underlying the Supreme Court case,Lawrence v. Texas, Lawrence and Tyron Garner were arrested under Texas’s Homosexual Conduct Law after police entered Lawrence’s home on Sept. 17, 1998, and saw them “engaging in a sexual act.” The couple challenged the law as unconstitutional, Lambda Legal backed their challenge, and the couple fought it up to the U.S. Supreme Court. Jenner & Block partner Paul Smith then argued the case for Lawrence and Garner on March 26, 2003.

Three months later on June 26, 2003, Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote the court’s opinion, holding, “At the heart of liberty is the right to define one’s own concept of existence, of meaning, of the universe, and of the mystery of human life. … Persons in a homosexual relationship may seek autonomy for these purposes, just as heterosexual persons do.”

At the time, Lambda Legal executive director Kevin Cathcart told The Advocate, “Because Tyron Garner and John Lawrence had the courage to challenge homophobic sodomy laws, the U.S. Supreme Court recognized that love, sexuality, and family play the same role in gay people’s lives as they do for everyone else. That’s a colossal legacy and one for which his community will forever be thankful.”

According to Lawrence’s obituary, “his dearest friend and partner, Jose Garcia,” cared for him at the end of his life. Funeral services were held on Nov. 23.

According to the obituary, in addition to Garcia, Lawrence was survived by his brother, sister and her husband, two nieces and two nephews, as well as a host of grand nieces and nephews, aunts, uncles, cousins and friends. Garner had died earlier, on Sept. 11, 2006.

In concluding the court case, Kennedy wrote an expansive defense of an evolving understanding of rights, later used in Massachusetts and elsewhere by courts holding that same-sex couples have a constitutional basis for equal marriage rights.

"Had those who drew and ratified the Due Process Clauses of the Fifth Amendment or the Fourteenth Amendment known the components of liberty in its manifold possibilities, they might have been more specific. They did not presume to have this insight," Kennedy held. "They knew times can blind us to certain truths and later generations can see that laws once thought necessary and proper in fact serve only to oppress. As the Constitution endures, persons in every generation can invoke its principles in their own search for greater freedom."

More monumental than making the news is that this lovely photo was also posted to the Navy’s own website.  I look forward to the day this is not news, but it is wonderful to see and such a lovely message to all LGBT troops right before the holidays.
Thank you for your service ladies!!

More monumental than making the news is that this lovely photo was also posted to the Navy’s own website.  I look forward to the day this is not news, but it is wonderful to see and such a lovely message to all LGBT troops right before the holidays.

Thank you for your service ladies!!

In first, lesbian couple get first kiss at Navy homecoming

By Corinne Reilly  The Virginian-Pilot  © December 21, 2011
VIRGINIA BEACH
It’s a time-honored tradition at Navy homecomings – one lucky sailor is chosen to be first off the ship for the long-awaited kiss with a loved one.
Today, for the first time, the happily reunited couple was gay.
The dock landing ship Oak Hill has been gone for nearly three months, training with military allies in Central America.
As the homecoming drew near, the crew and ship’s family readiness group sold $1 raffle tickets for the first kiss. Petty Officer 2nd Class Marissa Gaeta, 23, bought 50 - which is actually fewer than many people buy, she said, so she was surprised Monday to find out she’d won.
Her girlfriend of two years, Petty Officer 3rd Class Citlalic Snell, 22, was waiting when she crossed the brow.
They kissed. The crowd cheered. And with that, another vestige of the policy that forced gays to serve in secrecy vanished.
"It’s something new, that’s for sure," Gaeta told reporters after the kiss. "It’s nice to be able to be myself. It’s been a long time coming."
For the historical significance of the kiss, there was little to differentiate it from countless others when a Navy ship pulls into its home port following a deployment. Many onlookers waiting for their loved ones to come off the ship were busy talking among themselves.
The money raised by the first-kiss raffle was used to host a Christmas party for the children of sailors. David Bauer, commanding officer of the Oak Hill, said the crew’s reaction upon learning who was selected was positive.
"It’s going to happen and the crew’s going to enjoy it. We’re going to move on and it won’t overshadow the great things that this crew has accomplished over the past three months," Bauer said. The crew of more than 300 participated in exercises involving the militaries of Honduras, Guatemala, Colombia and Panama as part of Amphibious-Southern Partnership Station 2012.
Both women are Navy fire controlmen, who maintain and operate weapons systems on ships; Snell is based on the guided missile destroyer Bainbridge. They met at training school where they were roommates and have been dating for two years, which they said was difficult under “don’t ask, don’t tell.”
"We did have to hide it a lot in the beginning," Snell said. "A lot of people were not always supportive of it in the beginning, but we can finally be honest about who we are in our relationship, so I’m happy."
Snell said she believes their experience won’t be the last one for gays and lesbians in the military.
"I think that it’s something that is going to open a lot of doors, for not just our relationship, but all the other gay and lesbian relationships that are in the military now," she said.

Love it! 

In first, lesbian couple get first kiss at Navy homecoming

VIRGINIA BEACH

It’s a time-honored tradition at Navy homecomings – one lucky sailor is chosen to be first off the ship for the long-awaited kiss with a loved one.

Today, for the first time, the happily reunited couple was gay.

The dock landing ship Oak Hill has been gone for nearly three months, training with military allies in Central America.

As the homecoming drew near, the crew and ship’s family readiness group sold $1 raffle tickets for the first kiss. Petty Officer 2nd Class Marissa Gaeta, 23, bought 50 - which is actually fewer than many people buy, she said, so she was surprised Monday to find out she’d won.

Her girlfriend of two years, Petty Officer 3rd Class Citlalic Snell, 22, was waiting when she crossed the brow.

They kissed. The crowd cheered. And with that, another vestige of the policy that forced gays to serve in secrecy vanished.

"It’s something new, that’s for sure," Gaeta told reporters after the kiss. "It’s nice to be able to be myself. It’s been a long time coming."

For the historical significance of the kiss, there was little to differentiate it from countless others when a Navy ship pulls into its home port following a deployment. Many onlookers waiting for their loved ones to come off the ship were busy talking among themselves.

The money raised by the first-kiss raffle was used to host a Christmas party for the children of sailors. David Bauer, commanding officer of the Oak Hill, said the crew’s reaction upon learning who was selected was positive.

"It’s going to happen and the crew’s going to enjoy it. We’re going to move on and it won’t overshadow the great things that this crew has accomplished over the past three months," Bauer said. The crew of more than 300 participated in exercises involving the militaries of Honduras, Guatemala, Colombia and Panama as part of Amphibious-Southern Partnership Station 2012.

Both women are Navy fire controlmen, who maintain and operate weapons systems on ships; Snell is based on the guided missile destroyer Bainbridge. They met at training school where they were roommates and have been dating for two years, which they said was difficult under “don’t ask, don’t tell.”

"We did have to hide it a lot in the beginning," Snell said. "A lot of people were not always supportive of it in the beginning, but we can finally be honest about who we are in our relationship, so I’m happy."

Snell said she believes their experience won’t be the last one for gays and lesbians in the military.

"I think that it’s something that is going to open a lot of doors, for not just our relationship, but all the other gay and lesbian relationships that are in the military now," she said.

Love it! 

Source: hamptonroads.com

Homos for the Holidays: A Religion Survival Guide ⇢

(via HuffPo and written Rev. Jay Emerson Johnson, Ph.D)

Your daughter and her new girlfriend have joined you and your extended family for a holiday feast. You’re thrilled that they agreed to come. But your favorite uncle apparently didn’t get the memo about how great it would be to have a lesbian couple sitting at the table. Somewhere between the hors d’oeuvres and main course, he starts grumbling about how “crimes against nature” and “abominations” are ruining his holiday.

Do you: a) fake a migraine and escape to your bedroom for two hours; b) switch the topic to politics, which would surely be easier to talk about than this; or c) adopt a non-anxious, self-confident posture as you calmly explain why God has no problem with your daughter’s relationship and neither should anyone else?

I imagine most people would like to choose option “C,” but far too few feel sufficiently prepared to do it. I don’t recommend delivering a lecture on this topic over dinner. But if you’re worried about entertaining homos for the holidays, here’s a brief religion survival guide that can help soothe the family conversations. Just imagine chatting with your beloved uncle over eggnog. Whenever he makes one of the following claims (as he likely will), just respond calmly and lovingly in return, like this:

Uncle Claim #1: The Bible clearly condemns homosexuality.

Your Calm Response: Lots of people think exactly the same thing! But did you know that most biblical scholars agree that biblical writers never addressed gay and lesbian relationships as we know them today? The word “homosexuality” wasn’t even invented until the late 19th century. Biblical writers cared much more about guarding against idolatry and condemning social and economic injustice than worrying about who fell in love with whom. Want to talk about year-end bonuses for Wall Street moguls?

Uncle Claim #2: But wait, God destroyed Sodom because of all that gay sex, right?

Your Calm Response: Actually, in the story of Sodom in Genesis 19, all the men of Sodom attempt to gang-rape some foreign visitors. As in rape cases today, this act is not about sexuality but about violence, power, and the hatred of strangers. All the references to this story in the rest of the Hebrew Bible (the Christian Old Testament) confirm that the “sin” of Sodom was hatred of foreigners, pride, and abuse of the poor. No sexual “sin” is mentioned in any of these later references to the story of Sodom’s destruction. You know, biblical writers would probably urge us to discuss U.S. immigration policy if we’re going to talk about “sodomy.”

Uncle Claim #3: Well, OK. Still, the Bible clearly supports heterosexual marriage as the ideal.

Your Calm Response: I used to think so, too! But did you know that the primary form of marriage in the Hebrew Bible is polygamy, with the prize going to King Solomon, who was said to have 700 wives and 300 concubines? I was really surprised to realize that in the New Testament, both Jesus and Paul were unmarried and childless and seemed to recommend that everyone else follow their example (the best thing Paul could think to say about marriage is that it cures lust; take a look at 1 Corinthians 7). Actually, we could talk about the amazing biblical stories of same-sex devotion concerning Jonathan and David or Ruth and Naomi!

Uncle Claim #4: Then why did God create Adam and Eve, you know, rather than Adam and Steve?

Your Calm Response: Have you met Steve? He’s fabulous… OK, just kidding. But think about this: the biblical creation stories in Genesis never mention same-sex relationships of any kind. The purpose of those stories is to show that God is the creator of everything that exists — don’t you think that this would include people who have a sexual orientation towards others of the same sex? And think about the creation story in Genesis 2. That chapter seems to say that the explicit purpose of creating sexual partners is not for the procreation of children but instead for the relief of loneliness. Same-sex relationships fulfill that purpose of creation as well as different-sex relationships do — just look at your grand-niece! Doesn’t she seem happy with her girlfriend?

Uncle Claim #5: Of course she does! But the Church won’t accept her relationship!

Your Calm Response: You know what? Lots of churches will! And you know what else? The Church has never really figured out what to say about marriage. Way back in the first few centuries of Christianity, the Church actually elevated celibacy as the spiritual ideal, not marriage. Only in the medieval world and especially in the Protestant Reformation during the 16th century did Christians start to talk about marriage as a significant Christian vocation. Today, lots of churches recognize same-sex relationships as a blessing just like heterosexual couples are. But right now, dear uncle, don’t you think the most important thing is to make my daughter and her girlfriend feel welcome here, in our family?

Your holiday conversation probably won’t go exactly like that. But here’s the most important thing: religion is supposed to draw us together, create community, and deepen our love for one another. You love your uncle, and you love your lesbian daughter. Religion should never force you to choose between them. That’s the good news of religion this holiday season: God loves LGBT people just as much as your beloved uncle. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

North Carolina Voters Don't Know How Radical The Marriage Inequality Amendment Is ⇢

(via ThinkProgress)

A new Public Policy Polling poll shows that not only are North Carolina voters split on the proposed constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage, but they also don’t understand the extent of its impact. According to the poll, 58 percent of North Carolina voters say they will vote for the amendment in May, with respondents from all political parties supporting the measure. However, 56 percent of voters simultaneously report that they favor same-sex marriage (27 percent) or civil unions (29 percent).

This clear contradiction reveals a severe lack of education about the actual effect of the amendment. The text of it reads:

Constitutional amendment to provide that marriage between one man and one woman is the only domestic legal union that shall be valid or recognized in this State.

This means that the state constitution would ban recognition of all of the following:

  • Same-sex marriages.
  • Same-sex civil unions.
  • Same-sex domestic partnerships.
  • Opposite-sex domestic partnerships.

In fact, because of how the amendment was rushed through the legislature without proper checks on the text, it may even prohibit private businesses from offering benefits to domestic partners, including opposite-sex couples.

There seems to be a significant movable middle that would oppose the discriminatory amendment if they actually understood how harmful it could be to North Carolina society. Unfortunately, there are only 152 days until the vote to correct people’s misconceptions.

Prop 8 Lawyer Admits: No Harm to Straight Couples (by AmericanEqualRights)

Here’s the Prop 8 proponents’ lead counsel, Charles Cooper, at the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals on December 8th, admitting that marriage equality wouldn’t harm any heterosexual marriages

The appellate court judges are not buying any of this.  Also… wow… they know how flimsy their arguments are and yet they keep making them. Fools.

Source: youtube.com

Congress Drops Antigay Provisions in Defense Bill | News

(via The Advocate)

WASHINGTON — Lawmakers have dropped antigay provisions in the $662 billion annual Defense spending bill, including an amendment that would have barred military chaplains from performing same-sex weddings in their official capacities.Several antigay amendments had been included in the House version of the National Defense Authorization Act of 2012 passed in May. The bill’s conference committee, tasked with reconciling differences between the House bill and the Senate bill that passed earlier this month in a 93-7 vote, dropped the chaplain antigay amendment introduced by Rep. Todd Akin, a Missouri Republican, in favor of a Senate amendment offered by Mississippi Republican Sen. Roger Wicker that specifies that chaplains who object to gay unions and do “not wish to perform a marriage may not be required to do so.” Completion of the bill conference report was announced late Monday.Introduced in November, the Wicker amendment to the Senate bill was deemed by many advocates to be an acceptable political compromise that would not jeopardize the rights of chaplains or gay service members seeking to wed. After months of legal review, the Department of Defense announced in September that military chaplains may officiate in same-sex wedding ceremonies of service members in states where such unions are legal — a decision that drew anticipated backlash from social conservatives fiercely opposed to repealing “don’t ask, don’t tell.” “The Wicker amendment — while in my mind redundant and thus unnecessary — recognized what is already true under the First Amendment, that no military chaplain is required by any law or government official to perform any marriage ceremony that does not comply with the teachings and tenets of the military chaplain’s denomination or faith,” wrote Reverend Dr. C. Welton Gaddy, president of Interfaith Alliance, in an op-ed last week. Aubrey Sarvis, executive director of Servicemembers Legal Defense Network, said earlier this month that the Wicker amendment is “a restatement of the protections and guarantees that have always been there.” Two other antigay amendments also died in conference: One that would have superfluously affirmed the Defense of Marriage Act in Defense Department policies, and the other, now moot, that would have delayed implementation of DADT, which went into effect on September 20.
SLDN expressed disappointment that an outdated provision called Article 125 was not repealed in the conference report despite the Senate including repeal in its version of the bill. Article 125 bans certain sex acts between adults, including sodomy, but had become a lightning rod for attention from religious right-wing groups.According to the Associated Press, lawmakers hope to complete the bill on Wednesday, then send it on to President Obama. Controversial provisions on detention of suspected terrorists, which threatened a presidential veto, were revised to provide “a number of additional assurances that there will be no interference with civilian interrogations or other law enforcement activities,” Senate Armed Services Committee chairman Carl Levin of Michigan said in a Monday statement.

)

Congress Drops Antigay Provisions in Defense Bill | News

(via The Advocate)

WASHINGTON — Lawmakers have dropped antigay provisions in the $662 billion annual Defense spending bill, including an amendment that would have barred military chaplains from performing same-sex weddings in their official capacities.

Several antigay amendments had been included in the House version of the National Defense Authorization Act of 2012 passed in May. The bill’s conference committee, tasked with reconciling differences between the House bill and the Senate bill that passed earlier this month in a 93-7 vote, dropped the chaplain antigay amendment introduced by Rep. Todd Akin, a Missouri Republican, in favor of a Senate amendment offered by Mississippi Republican Sen. Roger Wicker that specifies that chaplains who object to gay unions and do “not wish to perform a marriage may not be required to do so.” Completion of the bill conference report was announced late Monday.

Introduced in November, the Wicker amendment to the Senate bill was deemed by many advocates to be an acceptable political compromise that would not jeopardize the rights of chaplains or gay service members seeking to wed. After months of legal review, the Department of Defense announced in September that military chaplains may officiate in same-sex wedding ceremonies of service members in states where such unions are legal — a decision that drew anticipated backlash from social conservatives fiercely opposed to repealing “don’t ask, don’t tell.” 

“The Wicker amendment — while in my mind redundant and thus unnecessary — recognized what is already true under the First Amendment, that no military chaplain is required by any law or government official to perform any marriage ceremony that does not comply with the teachings and tenets of the military chaplain’s denomination or faith,” wrote Reverend Dr. C. Welton Gaddy, president of Interfaith Alliance, in an op-ed last week. 

Aubrey Sarvis, executive director of Servicemembers Legal Defense Network, said earlier this month that the Wicker amendment is “a restatement of the protections and guarantees that have always been there.” 

Two other antigay amendments also died in conference: One that would have superfluously affirmed the Defense of Marriage Act in Defense Department policies, and the other, now moot, that would have delayed implementation of DADT, which went into effect on September 20.

SLDN expressed disappointment that an outdated provision called Article 125 was not repealed in the conference report despite the Senate including repeal in its version of the bill. Article 125 bans certain sex acts between adults, including sodomy, but had become a lightning rod for attention from religious right-wing groups.

According to the Associated Press, lawmakers hope to complete the bill on Wednesday, then send it on to President Obama. 

Controversial provisions on detention of suspected terrorists, which threatened a presidential veto, were revised to provide “a number of additional assurances that there will be no interference with civilian interrogations or other law enforcement activities,” Senate Armed Services Committee chairman Carl Levin of Michigan said in a Monday statement.

)

Source: advocate.com

Gingrich Pledges Not To Commit Infidelity A Third Time, Reaffirms Opposition To Marriage Equality
(via ThinkProgress - article title was just too good and too true to not repost)
 
As Iowa’s FAMiLY Leader prepares to endorse a presidential candidate ahead of the Jan. 3 Iowa caucuses, Newt Gingrich has issued a statement affirming the Leader’s pledge to oppose marriage equality for gays and lesbians, deny women access to abortion, and reduce the debt. Read his full responsehere and the marriage excerpt below:

Defending Marriage. As President, I will vigorously enforce the Defense of Marriage Act, which was enacted under my leadership as Speaker of the House, and ensure compliance with its provisions, especially in the military. I will also aggressively defend the constitutionality of DOMA in federal and state courts. I will support sending a federal constitutional amendment defining marriage as the union of one man and one woman to the states for ratification. I will also oppose any judicial, bureaucratic, or legislative effort to define marriage in any manner other than as between one man and one woman. I will support all efforts to reform promptly any uneconomic or anti-marriage aspects of welfare and tax policy. I also pledge to uphold the institution of marriage through personal fidelity to my spouse and respect for the marital bonds of others.

Vander Plaats welcomed Gingrich’s affirmation saying, “We are pleased that Speaker Gingrich has affirmed our pledge and are thankful we have on record his statements regarding DOMA, support of a federal marriage amendment, defending the unborn, pledging fidelity to his spouse, defending religious liberty and freedom, supporting sound pro-family economic issues, and defending the right of the people to rule themselves.”
In August, Gingrich said he wouldn’t sign the pledge unless the group adopted certain tweaks to their document, which had previously argued that African American children were better off during the period of slavery and called for a ban on pornography. Gingrich has long supported Vander Plaats and his efforts, however. Last year, he offered his vocal support for the Iowan’s successful campaign to oust three of the nine Iowa Supreme Court justices who had unanimously ruled in favor of marriage equality and his associates bankrolled more than one-third of the $850,000 campaign to remove the justices.

Gingrich Pledges Not To Commit Infidelity A Third Time, Reaffirms Opposition To Marriage Equality

(via ThinkProgress - article title was just too good and too true to not repost)

As Iowa’s FAMiLY Leader prepares to endorse a presidential candidate ahead of the Jan. 3 Iowa caucuses, Newt Gingrich has issued a statement affirming the Leader’s pledge to oppose marriage equality for gays and lesbians, deny women access to abortion, and reduce the debt. Read his full responsehere and the marriage excerpt below:

Defending Marriage. As President, I will vigorously enforce the Defense of Marriage Act, which was enacted under my leadership as Speaker of the House, and ensure compliance with its provisions, especially in the military. I will also aggressively defend the constitutionality of DOMA in federal and state courts. I will support sending a federal constitutional amendment defining marriage as the union of one man and one woman to the states for ratification. I will also oppose any judicial, bureaucratic, or legislative effort to define marriage in any manner other than as between one man and one woman. I will support all efforts to reform promptly any uneconomic or anti-marriage aspects of welfare and tax policy. I also pledge to uphold the institution of marriage through personal fidelity to my spouse and respect for the marital bonds of others.

Vander Plaats welcomed Gingrich’s affirmation saying, “We are pleased that Speaker Gingrich has affirmed our pledge and are thankful we have on record his statements regarding DOMA, support of a federal marriage amendment, defending the unborn, pledging fidelity to his spouse, defending religious liberty and freedom, supporting sound pro-family economic issues, and defending the right of the people to rule themselves.”

In August, Gingrich said he wouldn’t sign the pledge unless the group adopted certain tweaks to their document, which had previously argued that African American children were better off during the period of slavery and called for a ban on pornography. Gingrich has long supported Vander Plaats and his efforts, however. Last year, he offered his vocal support for the Iowan’s successful campaign to oust three of the nine Iowa Supreme Court justices who had unanimously ruled in favor of marriage equality and his associates bankrolled more than one-third of the $850,000 campaign to remove the justices.

Source: thinkprogress.org

Gay Sailor Jase Daniels Returns To Active Duty After Two DADT Discharges
(via On Top Magazine)
 
Gay sailor Petty Officer 2nd Class Jase Daniels (born Jason Daniel Knight) was reinstated in the U.S. Navy on Monday after twice being discharged under “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” the recently repealed policy that for 18 years banned gay and bisexual service members from serving openly.
Daniels, a 29-year-old Hebrew linguist, was discharged for violating “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” in April 2005 and again in March 2007.
“Today, I took an oath and affirmed to defend the Constitution of the United States of America. I am humbled as I am reinstated to the job I love and by the enormous support I have received on this momentous day,” Daniels said in a statement. “I look forward to returning to the Defense Language Institute, my career in the military.”
Daniels first entered the military in 2001. On his July, 2004 wedding night, Daniels accepted that he’s gay and moved to get his marriage annulled. In explaining his changing circumstances to the Navy, Daniels acknowledged his sexuality and was subsequently discharged.
Two years later, the Navy recalled Daniels and he served in Kuwait for a year with the U.S. Navy Customs Battalion Romeo before he was discharged a second time after he spoke to Stars and Stripes about serving openly in the military.
Servicemembers Legal Defense Network (SLDN) represented Daniels and two other service members in a 2010 lawsuit seeking their reinstatement to active duty.
“The reinstatement of Petty Officer Daniels into the United States Navy underscores that all qualified and needed service members are now officially welcomed back into the ranks,” said SLDN Executive Director Aubrey Sarvis. “The new policy and regulations in this post-repeal era make this historic occasion possible. We continue to work with our clients and the services to facilitate more reinstatements and help process applications for those discharged under DADT, who wish to serve their country again, whether it be on active duty, in the reserves, or in the guard.”

Gay Sailor Jase Daniels Returns To Active Duty After Two DADT Discharges

(via On Top Magazine)

Gay sailor Petty Officer 2nd Class Jase Daniels (born Jason Daniel Knight) was reinstated in the U.S. Navy on Monday after twice being discharged under “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” the recently repealed policy that for 18 years banned gay and bisexual service members from serving openly.

Daniels, a 29-year-old Hebrew linguist, was discharged for violating “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” in April 2005 and again in March 2007.

“Today, I took an oath and affirmed to defend the Constitution of the United States of America. I am humbled as I am reinstated to the job I love and by the enormous support I have received on this momentous day,” Daniels said in a statement. “I look forward to returning to the Defense Language Institute, my career in the military.”

Daniels first entered the military in 2001. On his July, 2004 wedding night, Daniels accepted that he’s gay and moved to get his marriage annulled. In explaining his changing circumstances to the Navy, Daniels acknowledged his sexuality and was subsequently discharged.

Two years later, the Navy recalled Daniels and he served in Kuwait for a year with the U.S. Navy Customs Battalion Romeo before he was discharged a second time after he spoke to Stars and Stripes about serving openly in the military.

Servicemembers Legal Defense Network (SLDN) represented Daniels and two other service members in a 2010 lawsuit seeking their reinstatement to active duty.

“The reinstatement of Petty Officer Daniels into the United States Navy underscores that all qualified and needed service members are now officially welcomed back into the ranks,” said SLDN Executive Director Aubrey Sarvis. “The new policy and regulations in this post-repeal era make this historic occasion possible. We continue to work with our clients and the services to facilitate more reinstatements and help process applications for those discharged under DADT, who wish to serve their country again, whether it be on active duty, in the reserves, or in the guard.”

Source: ontopmag.com

How To Explain Gay Rights To An Idiot
(via BuzzFeed)

How To Explain Gay Rights To An Idiot

(via BuzzFeed)

BuzzFeed

Gay Veteran Steals the Show at Romney Endorsement Event
(via ABC News)
MANCHESTER, N.H. - Mitt Romney had an uncomfortable exchange over same-sex marriage with a gay veteran having breakfast in New Hampshire this morning.
At an event that was meant to highlight the endorsement of Romney by Manchester Mayor Ted Gatsas, veteran Bob Garon of Ebson, N.H., asked the presidential candidate, who stopped by his breakfast table, whether he supports the repeal of the New Hampshire same-sex marriage law.
A Republican-controlled legislature has moved toward repealing the law, enacted in 2009 when Democrats controlled the legislature. A vote could come next month.
Romney told Garon, who was chowing down on his everyday staple of scrambled eggs and shaved ham at the restaurant Chez Vachon, that he supports a repeal of the same-sex marriage law, prompting an emotional exchange.
“I believe a marriage is between a man and a woman,” Romney said, joining Garon in the diner booth after shaking hands with several other patrons.
Garon responded, clarifying that what that meant was that if Romney is elected he would not support any legislation that would change the law so that gay servicemen would get the same benefits as heterosexual couples.
“I believe marriage is a relationship between a man and a woman,” Romney said. “We apparently disagree on that.”
“It’s good to know how you feel, that you do not believe everyone is entitled to their constitutional rights,” the 63-year-old New Hampshire resident responded.
“No, actually I think at the time the Constitution was written it was pretty clear marriage was between a man and a woman,” Romney said, just as one of his campaign aides chimed in that they had “to get going” to another Fox interview.
“Oh, I guess the question was too hot,” Garon quipped to Romney and his aide.
“No, I gave you the answer, you said you had a yes or no answer and I gave you the answer,” Romney said, turning back to face Garon.
“You did and I appreciate your answer. And I learned something, New Hampshire is right, you have to look a man in the eye to get a good answer and you know what governor?” Garon said, pausing. “Good luck. You’re going to need it.”
Romney laughed and agreed with Garon that he’d need the luck, shaking his hand before leaving. Garon then held court with the media, voicing his anger of Romney’s answer while also saying that he had “got what he asked for” when he poised the yes or no question.
Asked by reporters after Romney left why he feels so strongly about the issue, Garon grew even more passionate.
“Because I’m gay, all right?” he said. “And I happen to love a man just like you probably love your wife.”
Garon was sitting in a booth with his husband, whom he said he married in June.
“I went and fought for my country and I think my spouse should be entitled to the same [benefits as they would] if I were married to a woman,” he said. “What the hell is the difference?”

Gay Veteran Steals the Show at Romney Endorsement Event

(via ABC News)

MANCHESTER, N.H. - Mitt Romney had an uncomfortable exchange over same-sex marriage with a gay veteran having breakfast in New Hampshire this morning.

At an event that was meant to highlight the endorsement of Romney by Manchester Mayor Ted Gatsas, veteran Bob Garon of Ebson, N.H., asked the presidential candidate, who stopped by his breakfast table, whether he supports the repeal of the New Hampshire same-sex marriage law.

A Republican-controlled legislature has moved toward repealing the law, enacted in 2009 when Democrats controlled the legislature. A vote could come next month.

Romney told Garon, who was chowing down on his everyday staple of scrambled eggs and shaved ham at the restaurant Chez Vachon, that he supports a repeal of the same-sex marriage law, prompting an emotional exchange.

“I believe a marriage is between a man and a woman,” Romney said, joining Garon in the diner booth after shaking hands with several other patrons.

Garon responded, clarifying that what that meant was that if Romney is elected he would not support any legislation that would change the law so that gay servicemen would get the same benefits as heterosexual couples.

“I believe marriage is a relationship between a man and a woman,” Romney said. “We apparently disagree on that.”

“It’s good to know how you feel, that you do not believe everyone is entitled to their constitutional rights,” the 63-year-old New Hampshire resident responded.

“No, actually I think at the time the Constitution was written it was pretty clear marriage was between a man and a woman,” Romney said, just as one of his campaign aides chimed in that they had “to get going” to another Fox interview.

“Oh, I guess the question was too hot,” Garon quipped to Romney and his aide.

“No, I gave you the answer, you said you had a yes or no answer and I gave you the answer,” Romney said, turning back to face Garon.

“You did and I appreciate your answer. And I learned something, New Hampshire is right, you have to look a man in the eye to get a good answer and you know what governor?” Garon said, pausing. “Good luck. You’re going to need it.”

Romney laughed and agreed with Garon that he’d need the luck, shaking his hand before leaving. Garon then held court with the media, voicing his anger of Romney’s answer while also saying that he had “got what he asked for” when he poised the yes or no question.

Asked by reporters after Romney left why he feels so strongly about the issue, Garon grew even more passionate.

“Because I’m gay, all right?” he said. “And I happen to love a man just like you probably love your wife.”

Garon was sitting in a booth with his husband, whom he said he married in June.

“I went and fought for my country and I think my spouse should be entitled to the same [benefits as they would] if I were married to a woman,” he said. “What the hell is the difference?”

Source: abcnews.go.com

Without immigration rights, Utah gay couple seek new home abroad
(via The Salt Lake Tribune)
Benjamin Anderson, 55, and Mattia Lumaca, 41,  traveled from their Salt Lake City home this week to marry in New York  on their four-year anniversary as a couple. On Friday, they left for  Lumaca’s hometown near Parma, Italy, where they will spend Christmas  with Lumaca’s family.
But the honeymoon is bittersweet. They don’t  know if they will ever return together to the United States. After the  holidays, they will settle in Germany or another nation in the European  Union that recognizes same-sex unions (Italy does not).
Lumaca can offer Anderson rights as an  immigrant. But Anderson, a Coast Guard veteran, has no way to help his  husband stay in the United States after his student visa expires next  year.
“It took me a long time to find Mattia, and I  honestly believe God sent him to me. I’m not going to give him up,”  Anderson said in a phone interview from New York. “Of course, I would  stay here, but then I’d have to give up Mattia. Or I stay with Mattia,  but now I have to give up America? What kind of a horrible choice is  that? I love my country. I am a patriot.”
Even though six states and the District of  Columbia now allow gay and lesbian couples to marry, the Defense of  Marriage Act  (DOMA) prohibits the federal government from recognizing  same-sex marriages. Anderson cannot obtain legal residency and expedited  citizenship for his spouse as he could if he were married to a woman.  There are an estimated 28,500 binational same-sex couples in the United  States in a situation similar to Anderson and Lumaca’s, according to the  Williams Institute, a sexual orientation policy center at the  University of California, Los Angeles.
Earlier this year, the Obama administration  decided it would no longer defend DOMA in court challenges. And Sen.  Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., is pushing to repeal the law, which she  views as “discriminatory” because it denies legally married same-sex  couples more than 1,100 federal benefits. Another proposed bill, the  Uniting American Families Act, would grant immigration rights to  long-term, same-sex partners without recognizing them as married.
Utah’s congressional delegation opposes same-sex marriage.
“Like most Americans, Senator [Orrin] Hatch  firmly believes that marriage is a sacred union between one man and one  woman,” said Hatch’s spokesman, Mark Eddington, via email. “Without  DOMA, the majority of states that affirm traditional marriage could be  forced by the courts to recognize same-sex marriages and to subsidize  federal same-sex rights and benefits. He also opposes the so-called  Uniting American Families Act, which would extend the same immigration  benefits now reserved for married couples to same-sex relationships.”
Utah’s lone Democrat, Rep. Jim Matheson, said  through a spokeswoman that he also opposes extending immigration  benefits to same-sex partners.
This year, national public opinion polls have  shown that Americans are evenly split or slightly in favor of legalizing  gay marriage. In a Gallup poll conducted in May, 53 percent supported  recognizing same-sex marriages — a jump of nine percentage points from  the previous year.
Fracturing a family
Anderson and Lumaca hope federal policy changes in the future so they can return.
“I want America to bring us home,” Anderson said. “Mattia loves America. I love America. And I think that America needs us.”
It was important to both of them that Lumaca  not remain in the country illegally. They have sought legal counsel from  New York-based Immigration Equality, which advocates for immigration  rights for same-sex couples.
The couple also are leaving a year before  Lumaca’s visa expires because he is not allowed to work and has spent  his life savings. Anderson, meanwhile, cannot afford to pay Lumaca’s  student tuition and their living expenses on his disability and  retirement benefits.
Anderson leaves behind a 33-year-old son and is  risking his health with the move. He retired early from the Coast Guard  following exposure to chemicals and the development of a severe heart  condition, which has led to four heart attacks. He also suffers from  diabetes and glaucoma. He relies on Veterans Affairs health centers for  medical care. In Munich, Germany, where the couple plan to try living  first, he can access some health care at a nearby U.S. military base but  says some of the services and drugs he receives at the VA hospital in  Salt Lake City are not available abroad.
“It’s kind of a scary situation,” Anderson  said. “I’ve been given enough medicine for three months and then after  that, I’m kind of on my own.”
In 2006, Anderson was recovering from surgery  that removed his thyroid — and temporarily left him unable to speak —  when he met Lumaca on an Italian travel website. Anderson was dreaming  of an European vacation. Lumaca, an avid skier, was planning a trip to  Salt Lake City. The two agreed to have dinner when Lumaca visited Utah.  They spent much of Lumaca’s trip together and quickly fell in love even  though Anderson was still in recovery.
“He was going through these horrible medical  issues when I met him. I saw how he was a real fighter. He was gentle,  he was lovable, he made me feel comfortable,” recalled Lumaca. “When I  returned to Italy, I felt I had to go back. I was telling myself, ‘I  left something there. I left a piece of me with Ben.’ ”
Three months later, Lumaca secured a student  visa and moved to Salt Lake City in 2007. The couple hoped they would be  able to find a long-term solution later. Lumaca studied English at a  language institute. He took over as Anderson’s caregiver, sorting the 20  pills he needs each day and driving him to doctors’ appointments.
Jared Anderson worries about how his father  will fare abroad. In recent years, with father and son both living in  the Salt Lake Valley for the first time in a decade,
Jared has relished spending more time with his  father, who divorced his mother when Jared was 13 years old. At age 15,  he says he became a “fervent supporter” of gay rights, penning a high  school play about his father.
Jared Anderson doubts he will be able to afford to visit his father in Europe.
“For me, it’s not really a gay rights issue, it’s a family issue,” Jared Anderson said. “Because of this, I’m losing my family.”

Without immigration rights, Utah gay couple seek new home abroad

(via The Salt Lake Tribune)

Benjamin Anderson, 55, and Mattia Lumaca, 41, traveled from their Salt Lake City home this week to marry in New York on their four-year anniversary as a couple. On Friday, they left for Lumaca’s hometown near Parma, Italy, where they will spend Christmas with Lumaca’s family.

But the honeymoon is bittersweet. They don’t know if they will ever return together to the United States. After the holidays, they will settle in Germany or another nation in the European Union that recognizes same-sex unions (Italy does not).

Lumaca can offer Anderson rights as an immigrant. But Anderson, a Coast Guard veteran, has no way to help his husband stay in the United States after his student visa expires next year.

“It took me a long time to find Mattia, and I honestly believe God sent him to me. I’m not going to give him up,” Anderson said in a phone interview from New York. “Of course, I would stay here, but then I’d have to give up Mattia. Or I stay with Mattia, but now I have to give up America? What kind of a horrible choice is that? I love my country. I am a patriot.”

Even though six states and the District of Columbia now allow gay and lesbian couples to marry, the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) prohibits the federal government from recognizing same-sex marriages. Anderson cannot obtain legal residency and expedited citizenship for his spouse as he could if he were married to a woman. There are an estimated 28,500 binational same-sex couples in the United States in a situation similar to Anderson and Lumaca’s, according to the Williams Institute, a sexual orientation policy center at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Earlier this year, the Obama administration decided it would no longer defend DOMA in court challenges. And Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., is pushing to repeal the law, which she views as “discriminatory” because it denies legally married same-sex couples more than 1,100 federal benefits. Another proposed bill, the Uniting American Families Act, would grant immigration rights to long-term, same-sex partners without recognizing them as married.

Utah’s congressional delegation opposes same-sex marriage.

“Like most Americans, Senator [Orrin] Hatch firmly believes that marriage is a sacred union between one man and one woman,” said Hatch’s spokesman, Mark Eddington, via email. “Without DOMA, the majority of states that affirm traditional marriage could be forced by the courts to recognize same-sex marriages and to subsidize federal same-sex rights and benefits. He also opposes the so-called Uniting American Families Act, which would extend the same immigration benefits now reserved for married couples to same-sex relationships.”

Utah’s lone Democrat, Rep. Jim Matheson, said through a spokeswoman that he also opposes extending immigration benefits to same-sex partners.

This year, national public opinion polls have shown that Americans are evenly split or slightly in favor of legalizing gay marriage. In a Gallup poll conducted in May, 53 percent supported recognizing same-sex marriages — a jump of nine percentage points from the previous year.

Fracturing a family

Anderson and Lumaca hope federal policy changes in the future so they can return.

“I want America to bring us home,” Anderson said. “Mattia loves America. I love America. And I think that America needs us.”

It was important to both of them that Lumaca not remain in the country illegally. They have sought legal counsel from New York-based Immigration Equality, which advocates for immigration rights for same-sex couples.

The couple also are leaving a year before Lumaca’s visa expires because he is not allowed to work and has spent his life savings. Anderson, meanwhile, cannot afford to pay Lumaca’s student tuition and their living expenses on his disability and retirement benefits.

Anderson leaves behind a 33-year-old son and is risking his health with the move. He retired early from the Coast Guard following exposure to chemicals and the development of a severe heart condition, which has led to four heart attacks. He also suffers from diabetes and glaucoma. He relies on Veterans Affairs health centers for medical care. In Munich, Germany, where the couple plan to try living first, he can access some health care at a nearby U.S. military base but says some of the services and drugs he receives at the VA hospital in Salt Lake City are not available abroad.

“It’s kind of a scary situation,” Anderson said. “I’ve been given enough medicine for three months and then after that, I’m kind of on my own.”

In 2006, Anderson was recovering from surgery that removed his thyroid — and temporarily left him unable to speak — when he met Lumaca on an Italian travel website. Anderson was dreaming of an European vacation. Lumaca, an avid skier, was planning a trip to Salt Lake City. The two agreed to have dinner when Lumaca visited Utah. They spent much of Lumaca’s trip together and quickly fell in love even though Anderson was still in recovery.

“He was going through these horrible medical issues when I met him. I saw how he was a real fighter. He was gentle, he was lovable, he made me feel comfortable,” recalled Lumaca. “When I returned to Italy, I felt I had to go back. I was telling myself, ‘I left something there. I left a piece of me with Ben.’ ”

Three months later, Lumaca secured a student visa and moved to Salt Lake City in 2007. The couple hoped they would be able to find a long-term solution later. Lumaca studied English at a language institute. He took over as Anderson’s caregiver, sorting the 20 pills he needs each day and driving him to doctors’ appointments.

Jared Anderson worries about how his father will fare abroad. In recent years, with father and son both living in the Salt Lake Valley for the first time in a decade,

Jared has relished spending more time with his father, who divorced his mother when Jared was 13 years old. At age 15, he says he became a “fervent supporter” of gay rights, penning a high school play about his father.

Jared Anderson doubts he will be able to afford to visit his father in Europe.

“For me, it’s not really a gay rights issue, it’s a family issue,” Jared Anderson said. “Because of this, I’m losing my family.”

Source: sltrib.com

About

Civilly Unioned was started to document and comment on issues & culture around all LGBT issues, especially marriage equality and family issues. I welcome, and encourage, any commentary and questions about what I post.

For more information about me, check out the Who's Posting? tab.


Ask me anything Submit