Post(s) tagged with "don't ask don't tell"

Mayor Krieger, meet Maj. Rogers, a fallen hero who happened to be gay ⇢

Maj. Alan Greg Rogers was killed by an improvised explosive devise during his second tour of duty in Iraq on Jan. 27, 2008. I wish Yuma Mayor Al Krieger could have met Alan - his life and ultimate sacrifice exemplifies why Krieger owes gay and lesbian servicemembers far more than a faux apology for his recent statement about “limp-wristed” soldiers (see the June 11 article “Ariz. mayor sorry for calling gays ‘limp-wristed’ “).

Over a decade earlier, Alan and I became friends while he was stationed at Fort Huachuca. His life was as complex as it was inspiring - he was adopted at 5 years old, an intelligence officer in the Army, an ordained Baptist minister, African American, and he also happened to be gay.

Alan loved serving his country, loved his Christian faith and was proudly gay. He not only refused to forsake any part of himself because of anti-gay discrimination, he gave his life for his country despite that discrimination.

Red the rest of the editorial

Source: azstarnet.com

No DADT Filibuster ⇢

The conservative Washington Times (which is a good source of news on, well, Washington conservatives) reports that Sen. John McCain will not filibuster against the repeal of don’t ask, don’t tell. “The fact that Mr. McCain will not filibuster means repeal is all but certain, although Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates has latitude on the timeline,” according to the paper.

The decision not to filibuster drops the number of needed votes down to a simple majority of 51. That Republicans are caving shows that despite some primary posturing (McCain is in a tight race with a more conservative opponent), they know which way the wind is blowing

(via Independent Gay Forum via Washington Times)

Source: indegayforum.org

Gay soldier serving in Baghdad writes Rep. Ike Skelton and demands apology for anti-gay comments ⇢

Read and pass on.  We should all write or congressmen with the same vigor and request. (via Pam’s House Blend)


June 17, 2010

Representative Ike Skelton                                                              
US House of Representatives
2206 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515-2504

Dear Representative Skelton,

It was in Ray County, Missouri that I first decided that I would join the Army. I was sitting on the pond dock at my father’s home, and came to the realization that my life was not heading anywhere that I wanted it to. I had no way to pay for college, and it seemed I would be stuck in that town not amounting to much. I went and spoke with a recruiter in Liberty, Missouri and eleven days later I was sitting at Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

Nearly four years later, I do not regret that decision. I am now sitting in Baghdad preparing to redeploy back to the United States for a second, and final time. I can honestly say I am proud of the work we have done here. I look at the Iraqis that I personally helped train as a member of the Military Transition Team and can rest assured that we are leaving the area in capable hands. Through serving the country in the United States Army I have become more patriotic than I knew possible.

However, my pride in the Army and what we stand for has been yanked away. One of the first lessons that I learned after joining the Army was the importance of Integrity. I have served our great country honorably in two deployments. I have earned eight awards and have a clean record. I was one of the first responders to Muqdadiyah in 2007 when then President Bush ordered the surge, where my unit spent fifteen months in various provinces. I returned again nine months ago to finish what we started and am proud to be a member of the last combat brigade operating in theatre.

Although my record is untarnished, there is one thing separating myself and the rest of ‘America’s hero’s.’ Though I have less than a year left before my contract has been served, I was informed that the Army is considering discharging me under the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” law, and this hurts extensively. My command realizes and respects the efforts and contributions to my unit and the fact that we are low-manned. It seems that they are holding out as long as they can on my discharge process, waiting for “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” to be repealed.

I can understand if your views are against gay and lesbians in general, but sir you must realize your unique role in the United States. Were it not for uncomfortable truths there would be no need for you at all. As a representative of the State of Missouri and a leader in Congress’ role pertaining to the Military, it is imperative that you not succumb to weak leadership. However, I find it disturbingly necessary to remind you today of your job and that is to open national discussions on issues to find the best resolution. That is your job, and were it not, there would be no need for Congress.

Congressman Skelton, I demand that you apologize for your remarks. You need to recognize the disrespect that you issued to the gay and lesbian soldiers, like myself, who are currently serving regardless if we are recognized or not. I demand that you look at this from my perspective. I have spent the majority of my adult life fighting for a war in which you sent me to. I am fighting for your safety and freedom, and for every “mommy and daddies” seven year olds’ freedom and safety. I come in from a long day out in the streets of Baghdad and see on television my representative, my voice, condemning the act of acknowledging my existence.

Congressman regardless of your personal views on the issue, we are serving now. To be disrespectful to us is not only intolerant but ignorant. We deserve at the bare minimum an honest assessment and a fair judgment on the matter. In order for this to happen you, as the Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, must allow these discussions to take place. I will continue fighting for your freedom congressman, will you cease blocking mine?

United States Army (Specialist E4)
Baghdad, Iraq

Source: pamshouseblend.com

gayinnj:

Army National Guard Lieutenant Dan Choi has spoken out against ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ since publicly coming out.

gayinnj:

Army National Guard Lieutenant Dan Choi has spoken out against ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ since publicly coming out.

Frontlines, The SLDN Blog | Servicemembers Legal Defense Network
“Stories from the Frontlines: Letters to President Barack Obama”  is a new media campaign launched to underscore the urgent need for  congressional action and presidential leadership at this critical point  in the fight to repeal “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” (DADT). Every weekday  morning as we approach the markup of the Defense Authorization bill in  the Senate and House Armed Services Committees, SLDN and a coalition of  voices supporting repeal, will share an open letter to the President  from a person impacted by this discriminatory law.  We are urging the  President to include repeal in the Administration’s defense budget  recommendations, but also to voice his support as we work to muster the  15 critical votes needed on the Senate Armed Services Committee to  include repeal.  The Defense Authorization bill represents the best  legislative vehicle to bring repeal to the president’s desk.  It also  was the same vehicle used to pass DADT in 1993.  By working together, we  can help build momentum to get the votes!  We ask that you forward and  post these personal stories.

Frontlines, The SLDN Blog | Servicemembers Legal Defense Network

“Stories from the Frontlines: Letters to President Barack Obama” is a new media campaign launched to underscore the urgent need for congressional action and presidential leadership at this critical point in the fight to repeal “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” (DADT). Every weekday morning as we approach the markup of the Defense Authorization bill in the Senate and House Armed Services Committees, SLDN and a coalition of voices supporting repeal, will share an open letter to the President from a person impacted by this discriminatory law. We are urging the President to include repeal in the Administration’s defense budget recommendations, but also to voice his support as we work to muster the 15 critical votes needed on the Senate Armed Services Committee to include repeal. The Defense Authorization bill represents the best legislative vehicle to bring repeal to the president’s desk. It also was the same vehicle used to pass DADT in 1993. By working together, we can help build momentum to get the votes! We ask that you forward and post these personal stories.

Source: sldn.org

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