On May 18, 1970 Michael McConnell and Jack Baker became the first known gay couple to apply for a marriage license in the US.  The  Clerk of Court in Hennepin County, Minnesota denied them a license. They sued and lost in District  Court, appealed and lost in the Minnesota Supreme Court, and appealed to  the U.S. Supreme Court, which dismissed the case for want of a  substantial federal question. The case opinion, Baker v. Nelson, has been frequently cited as precedent  in various gay marriage cases since then.
In 1971, the couple applied for and were awarded a marriage  license in Mankato, Minnesota, and were  married before a Methodist minister in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  They maintain that they are legally married under this license; the  government claims that the Supreme Court ruling automatically makes this  marriage license null and void. During the early 1970s, they filed  joint tax returns, which were accepted by the IRS. In 2004, after  passage of Defense of Marriage Act, their joint  tax return was rejected, and they filed suit against the IRS.
Baker and McConnell are still together today.
Photo by Kay Tobin Lahusen.
They wanted to marry (by Bob Bobster)

On May 18, 1970 Michael McConnell and Jack Baker became the first known gay couple to apply for a marriage license in the US.  The Clerk of Court in Hennepin County, Minnesota denied them a license. They sued and lost in District Court, appealed and lost in the Minnesota Supreme Court, and appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, which dismissed the case for want of a substantial federal question. The case opinion, Baker v. Nelson, has been frequently cited as precedent in various gay marriage cases since then.

In 1971, the couple applied for and were awarded a marriage license in Mankato, Minnesota, and were married before a Methodist minister in Minneapolis, Minnesota. They maintain that they are legally married under this license; the government claims that the Supreme Court ruling automatically makes this marriage license null and void. During the early 1970s, they filed joint tax returns, which were accepted by the IRS. In 2004, after passage of Defense of Marriage Act, their joint tax return was rejected, and they filed suit against the IRS.

Baker and McConnell are still together today.

Photo by Kay Tobin Lahusen.

They wanted to marry (by Bob Bobster)

Notes

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    oh god. they’re too cute for me to handle.
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